Tuesday, June 4

Busy, busy busy!

There's still lots of seeds to sow and lots to plant on the plot but things are starting to fill up, Isn't it satisfying to see the bare earth gradually turning green with leaf growth?

The potatoes beds are at varying stages corresponding to when we popped in the seed potatoes. We still have a few left to plant!
Three varieties of broad beans have now been planted and are also at various stages of development with the first lot starting to produce flowers.
The middle ones - Crimson Flowered have just been planted.

The peas haven't yet suffered any weevil attack so fingers crossed that they do well and produce a good crop this year. We haven't really had a bountiful pea crop for the last couple of years.
The spring planted onions and shallots are also at two different stages - well I suppose really three stages. We planted out two batches that were started off in modules. The first lot are growing steadily. There were a few little weed seedlings to remove from the planting line but otherwise the weed control is doing its job. I just loosened the soil around the sets a little with a daisy grubber so the seedlings should die off. The second lot are bedding in.
And the second lot are settling in.
The unused sets were planted tightly together in a trench and should go on to produce small onions - they have in the past. It's our way of using up the sets and does provide some useful sized onions, in fact last year following a poor onion crop they were really a valuable addition to our winter store.

We also have a few (very few) winter onions that have survived and the garlic is still going strong. The garlic planted in a tub in the greenhouse is dying down so I will have to see what has happened below compost.
The carrots and parsnips are germinating and producing true seed leaves. I spent a little time with my head under the enviromesh pulling out the weed seedlings - as with the onions these were along the planting line. This was a much easier job than before the weed control fabric was used. It's the second year of using the same fabric and, although there is some fraying, it is still fit for purpose. 
I understand that you can buy fray resistant fabric but haven't sourced any yet.

This weekend we planted some cabbages, cauliflower, sprouts and calabrese. 
The weed control had been in place on this bed for a while and I noticed that the soil was much more moist underneath. The brassicas were planted in cross shaped slits and it struck me that this meant the fabric would double up as cabbage root fly protection. As wood pigeons no doubt were rubbing their wings together in anticipation, the young plants were netted. We used insect proof netting to hopefully also keep the white butterflies at bay!

The first lot of lettuce - three varieties- have been planted again reusing the fabric from last year. Beetroot and radish have been sown in the same bed.

Again protection is in place. The chicken wire tunnels aren't quite long enough so the plants at the end will have to take their chance. There will be plenty for us and the birds to nibble.



Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

20 comments:

  1. Goodness, you've been busy. The fabric really looks to be working out for you, everything's looking so neat and tidy. My broad bean plants are now producing beans, it won't be long until they're ready, but there isn't a huge amount. I think the plants suffered when they were kept in modules owing to the cold, wet weather. My parsnips are just starting to germinate, there's probably half a dozen or so just popped through the soil so I hope the rest of them follow.

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    1. The fabric is still covering the bed that had winter brassicas planted and is still looking weed free, Jo. Where we took the fabric off to prepare a bed for the next crop it was quite easy to tidy up - unlike the uncovered beds so it's a case of so far so good!

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  2. Some very well thought-out technical solutions there, Sue. We gardeners certainly do have to go to a lot of trouble to produce good crops! Unprotected crops just wouldn't survive, would they? It makes you wonder what people used to do before they were able to buy all these nets, fleece, mesh etc so easily via the internet.

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    1. Gardening and problem solving go together don't they, Mark. Our structures gradually adapt from on year to the next! I think we really need a biodome though as the pests and diseases just seem to be on the increase, Everything could do to be covered!

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  3. Things seem to be coming on nicely, everything looks so organised!

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    1. Parts are an organised mess, Stacey

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  4. Lordy Sue you have so much growing and they all seem to be romping awy happily. Your carrots look brilliant, mine aren't even showing yet despite the fleece.
    It is good to see healthy growth finally isn't it and it should only get warmer from hereon in.

    Linda

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    1. It is good to see things growing, Linda fingers crossed things keep going now!

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  5. Brilliant to see how you're tackling the weeds problems, Sue. They're the bane of my life as I'm too busy during the week to keep on top of it! I confess I'm relieved to know you've still got some potatoes to plant out - me too! A friend said she'd chucked her seed potatoes out, thinking it was too late to plant, which made me feel like a rubbish gardener but I carried on regardless; you've restored my confidence! I'm interested in your closely planted leftover onion sets - I have a couple of dozen spares - how close is close? I'm going to give your method a go!

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    1. Close is touching Caro. The potatoes weren't growing earlier anyway and we often [plant things later than everyone else so nothing to lose.

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  6. Strewth, everything's looking pretty great there Sue. It's amazing how quickly things are moving now, all the more so after the extended winter held everything back. You've really gone to town on the protections and fabric this year, looks like it's working a treat.

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    1. We have Lee and so far it is. Hopefully it will give us more time for doing other things rather than weeding.

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  7. Everything is looking good Sue - I've noticed myself how much stronger the potatoes are this year - hoping for good crops.

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    1. Let's hope for a few good crops Elaine. I'm really hoping for a decent pea crop this year!

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  8. Lots of lovely growth there, Sue. It is exciting to see everything doing well, isn't it.

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  9. OMG! You HAVE been busy! I'm rather jealous of your fantastic crops though, mine are all weed ridden.....off I run with a trowel.xxxx

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    1. The joys of weed control fabric, Snowbird - hope it keeps working

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  10. Everything looks great. I am envious of those parsnips, I haven't had one germinate this year though I haven't given up yet and will sow some more!

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    1. Parsnips seem to be very fickle, Tanya for us they have germinated better than ever this year

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