Monday, May 6

To the root of the matter

As I mentioned in a previous post we have managed to plant many of our seed potatoes - just a few more to go but, before we can plant the remaining tubers, the destination bed needs sorting out,

We have now sown our carrots and parsnips. As usual the seeds have been sown in shallow trenches of multi-purpose compost. We are reusing the weed control fabric used for last year's carrots and have added more to use with the parsnips. Following last year's successful trial we are going to use this fabric more widely this year. The aim is to cut down on weeding on some areas of the plot so we can tackle other areas that need a bit of renovation.
As a precaution we have used slug pellets under the fabric - well away from wild-life. Not only should the fabric keep down the weeds but it should also act as a mulch to conserve moisture (if needed!) and, being black, it should also warm the soil a little (probably more useful!).
As usual no sooner were the carrot seeds sown than an enviromesh 'tent' was constructed to protect them from the onslaught of carrot root fly. We were able to move the framework from last year's carrot bed over onto the bed for this year. Temporarily the enviromesh has also been laid over the parsnip area as some unidentified animals delight in walking over newly sown seeds and leaving deep paw marks which do nothing to aid seed germination.
Another potential advantage of the enviromesh tent is that the area should benefit from some protection against drying winds.

Now all that remains is to make sure the seed trenches don't dry out. 


Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

13 comments:

  1. It's good that you've found a way to cut down on the weeds, especially in the carrot bed where you don't want to be lifting the Enviromesh all the time.

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    1. It certainly worked well last year, Jo.

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  2. I'm glad it's not just me that suffers from the depredations of "unidentified animals" trotting around all over my raised beds in the middle of the night! Foxes, I reckon! I see one transiting through my garden almost every evening, and frequently in the morning too - going the other way! [We humans call it "commuting"!]

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    1. I think our 'creature' is a fox too, Mark - I know we have them come onto the site.

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  3. My father in law just gave us some fisherman nettings so we can prevent chicken, duck and geese from disturbing the plants.

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    1. In many ways we ought to cover everything on the plot to guard against some pest or other, Diana

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  4. Goodness that's a lot of trouble you have to go to to keep down weeds and unwanted visitors - it makes my garden look underdressed with just mesh cloches for protection

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    1. It's a different ball game in a garden - Elaine. I would want something a little more pleasing to look at if we grew everything in our garden. Also somehow perennial weeds such as dock and creeping buttercup grow much more on the plot than in the garden - maybe due to the fact that we are surrounded by potential weed seed homes. Then the plot is a big one too and we can't just pop out for an hour's weeding after dinner.

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  5. Wowsa, that is some carrot fly deterrent you have there, the little blighters don't stand a chance.
    That's also alot of weed prevention but less weeding means more time enjoying the allotment so you're onto a winner there.
    Thank you for sharing

    Linda

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    1. And the odd one still seems o get through Linda. AS for weed prevention - you ain't seen nothing yet!

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  6. Good idea to put slug pellets under the fabric as that would be a great location for them to hide. I hope we have less snails and slugs this year but I imagine my garden will be full of them.

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    1. Funnily enough we had less slug damage last year where we used the fabric and when it was removed there wasn't much if any sign of them.

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  7. I'm sure no carrot root fly will force its way through this tent.

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