Monday, May 27

The food of love

Back in March 2010 we planted a quince tree - Meeches Prolific. Funny I thought it had been planted longer than that but my picture album doesn't lie.
We had never tasted quinces but we were looking for new fruit to plant and we decided that even if we ended up not liking the fruit - the description of the tree sounded beautiful. 

The flowers really are beautiful.
So much so that we had one photograph turned into a canvas print for our bedroom wall.
They also have a really subtle perfume that you catch when you pass close by.

The leaves are beautiful too - very felty like the young fruits.
Surprisingly we harvested our first fruits during the first year - not many but enough to find out that we thought they were delicious. Each year we have had a few fruits but this year is full of promise as the tree is loaded with blossom and looks stunning. It's difficult to take a photo that does the tree justice.
If all that blossom sets fruit then the tree will have a problem as quince fruits grow fairly large and are quite heavy. We may even have to overcome our natural reluctance to remove some fruit.
But lots can happen between now and then - the fruit has to actually set first - fingers crossed! Although the bees seem to be trying their best to do their bit.
So why 'The food of love' title? Quince fruits are sometimes referred to as golden apples and many believe that early references to apples - including the fruit, assumed to be an apple, in the garden of Eden given by Eve to Adam - were in fact referring to the quince. The ancient Greeks dedicated quinces to the goddess of love and also apparently gave them to a bride at her wedding and were shared by the bride and groom to sweeten their breath.




Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

27 comments:

  1. A very beautiful and informative set of photos, Sue. I didn't know that Quinces were supposedly the "apples" of the garden of Eden.

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    1. I guess there are probably other theories too, Mark but quince is a very old fruit.

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  2. Quinces are very thankful trees. There is no need to remove fruits. Quinces have strong branches, they will bend but not break and it's capable of producing healthy fruits no matter how many there are :) We have one tree that's 20 years old and every year we get around 220lbs of fruit. The older your tree gets the more fruit will produce :)

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    1. So do you think even my trees tiny thin branches will stand the 'here's hopeful' strain, Leanan?

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  3. I've never eaten quince fruits too, I don't know anybody who grows the quince here in Poland.

    Many people here grow Japanese quince instead. It has smaller fruits, which smell very pleasantly, and they are great in jams or compotes. My mom covers chopped Japanese quince fruits with sugar and after a few days we've got a very delicious and healthy (rich in vit.C) syrup which we add to tea. These fruits can't be eaten raw because they're hard and sour.

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    1. We have Japanese quince in the garden growing up a fence but I've never eaten that fruit, Dewberry

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  4. Terrific photos of the bees doing their thing!

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  5. A neighbour we once had grew Quince trees but I don't ever remember seeing fruit on them!
    What do they taste like?
    Loving the canvas print, such a lovely image.

    Linda - The Tenacious Gardener

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    1. It lovely and taste a little of honey, Linda but a fruity sort of honey taste.

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  6. How lovely is that blossom? I've never tasted quince, I always thought it was similar to pear....

    I love your print, and the bee enjoying the blossom. Gorgeous!xxxx

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    1. It's a pear shape, Snowbird - well our variety is but some are rounder.

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  7. The blossom is really pretty, I can see why you chose this for a print for your bedroom wall. It looks like it's going to be another great fruit year for you.

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    1. I hope so, Jo but having said that the nectarine was loaded with flower and I tried pollinating with a soft brush in case the pollinators weren't about and there is no evidence of any fruit having set!

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  8. The blossom and the bees are lovely! It does seem to have been a good year for blossom so hopefully plenty of fruit will follow

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    1. All a bit later than usual though, Belinda.

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  9. I have high hopes for some fruit on our Mullberry this year now it's in it's second year in it's new position.

    I love quince cheese but never expect to grow them in Scotland. It's reminiscent of the figs I remember from our garden in my youth - we never once got a fruit to ripen!

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    1. We've never made quince cheese - is it like lemon cheese - but obviously tastes different - what I mean is, is it the same type of thing?

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    2. Meant to ask - how big does a mulberry grow?

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  10. I have been toying with the idea of getting a quince tree but wasn't sure what I would do with all the fruit. Do you eat them like an apple or do you have to cook them - say for quince jelly.

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    1. You cook them Elaine - we use them in a similar way to apples - crumbles - pies - compote. We've also mixed them with apples as they make a good combination. You can use them in all sorts of ways - there are lots of recipes on the internet - but we have never had so many that we have explored other ways of using them yet. If things go well maybe this year!

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  11. This looks as though it is a very beautiful and productive tree. I think I'll add this to my wish list for my fruit garden. Thanks for the info. Chel x

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    1. It is Chel although up until now we have had only 8 or 9 fruits each year but it is still a baby.

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  12. Do the actual fruit smell as nice as I have read, I am thinking of investing in a dwarf variety? I say investing its a forgone conclusion really.

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    1. When they are cooking they smell delicious, Jo.

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  13. I use to buy quince with expensive price over here! How good to have them in the garden! yummy!

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    1. I haven't seen the fruit for sale here but it is yummy, Malar

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