Tuesday, April 23

It's not just rhubarb!

Rhubarb had featured in some blogs recently. Bloggers have been comparing the progress or lack of it with respect to the growth of the clumps of rhubarb on their plots. Some have been posting about pulling their first sticks and others have been lamenting that this treat is still far off.


Much of this variance could be down to the variety of rhubarb being grown. As many clumps are inherited maybe some gardeners don't realise just how many different varieties of rhubarb there are and that as for other crops varieties mature at different times.

We have several clumps of rhubarb on our plot giving an extended cropping season but I think the four clumps below which are planted in the same bed show that different varieties have their own timetable.
The two smaller clumps near the greenhouse are a later variety and so much smaller than the two clumps in the foreground.

So if you have an established clump of rhubarb that still is nowhere near ready for cropping maybe you have one of the later cropping varieties and if you want have some sticks to use a little earlier you could add another earlier variety to your collection.



PS Don't forget the competition to win a fire pit - more information here (I do hope you manage to take part as I am looking forward to reading your stories - I'm not judging so I can just enjoy)!

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

32 comments:

  1. I'm happy to say mine are late varieties. They are certainly putting on some growth now though. Your Timperley Early variety looks fab.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you know what variety you have, Jo

      Delete
  2. my eyes widely open seeing your rhubarb!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you grow rhubarb in your part of the world Zamzurina? (or is it Zulkafli?)

      Delete
  3. I've posted about rhubarb today too, great minds and all that. I'm hoping to get mine planted out at the allotment this week, I just hope they do as well as yours, they look good clumps you've got there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So have I Jo, Sue has been kind enough to comment on my site. It would be good to hear from you too!




      Delete
    2. Must be because we all live in Yorkshire!

      Delete
  4. Is Victoria variety worth growing? I bought a plant of this variety this spring because I was tempted by its history (that it's 175 years old, it was grew for the Queen Victoria etc.) I was to choose between Victoria and Red Champagne.

    Sue, which variety of yours is in your opinion the tastiest? I mean, the best for pies and compotes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was grown not grew :) Such a horrible mistake.

      Delete
    2. Not such a terrible mistake Dewberry. I does depend whether you want an early or late variety and whether you want green stick or red, WE grow Champagne but haven't found it a strong grower so I guess of the two Victoria performs better for us.

      Delete
  5. Hello again Sue, I bought my first rhubarb just last month after seeing it in a garden centre (I potted it up and kept it in my greenhouse) as my chef in training daughter was going to use it in an exam recipe (she didn't in the end). So now I have the Victoria variety of Rhubarb in a pot to put somewhere - do you think it would be happy enough growing there? I don't think I've got a suitable space for it in my garden - does it need a lot of sunshine and are they hungry plants? Thanks :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It doesn't need lots of sunshine Shirl and I would imagine it would outgrow a pot - unless someone else has grown it in this way and knows better. They do benefit from feeding and people often give the crown a top dressing of manure - we tend to use garden compost. It does make quite a good ornamental plant with the large crinkly leave - after all there are some ornamental varieties e.g. rheum.

      Delete
  6. I inherited my rhubarb so I don't know the name. However, I always try to compare it with everyone else's so I found your post very good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Does it tend to be earlier of later than everyone else's Kelli?

      Delete
  7. Mine was grown from some unnamed seeds in a seed swap. I've always thought it was a bit of an early variety but seeing the size of your Timperley Early plant, I think mine must be a later one. In size it looks more like the ones at the back of your photo. I love the name 'Giant Grooveless' - I might have to get some just for the name!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The red sticks produce lovely stewed fruit too Jules.

      Delete
  8. I have no idea which rhubarb I have but I am going to be adding to it this year as I only have one crown and with having more room on the bee plot I will be planting some up here. I think I will probably be inheriting it rather than buying it though so I still won't know which type I have...maybe just watching and waiting will give me some idea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of ours are unknown varieties too Tanya.

      Delete
  9. Why are people surprised that not all Rhubarb is the same? No-one suggests that all potatoes, or all carrots are the same, so why should Rhubarb not come in different varieties that mature at different times? It's nice that we can extend the harvest period by growing different ones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why not indeed? I guess it's just that many people just think of it as rhubarb rather than looking out for a particular variety.

      Delete
  10. What an interesting comparison with the different rhubarbs Sue. I have two Timperley Early's in giant pots and they are steaming along. I'd love another variety to pick from later but have no idea where I would fit it in, they get to be such monsters!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are some varieties that don't grow as large, Paula. A supplier should be able to advise you.

      Delete
  11. Wow huge. Tempting me to have a go for rhubarb. But I don't think they will like the heat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It needs a period of cold Diana which I don't think you could provide

      Delete
  12. That photo really shows the difference in the varieties, really good. You will be harvesting that wonderful crop for weeks. I've got Timperley early which I just harvested some from. Then I've planted another unknown variety which needs settling in a bit before any harvesting goes on there. But may choose some of the late varieties for another crop a bit later.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hopefully plenty to freeze too Annie

      Delete
  13. I wish I had the space to grow more than one type of rhubarb and get that extended season Sue, as it is I am just happy to have neighbours with what they think of as far too much rhubarb - I get to dig up a chunk and pick their plants whenever I want, which should tide me over until my own are large enough to harvest in a couple of years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a handy neighbour to have Janet!

      Delete
  14. That's very great looking rhubarb! Looking forward for rhubarb cake or pie? ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Crumbles and crumble muffins at least Malar and maybe the odd pie!

      Delete
  15. I can't resist reading posts about Rhubarb, (or eating it). I'm not going to brag about my Rhubarb this year, just to say its better than last years and probably not as good as next years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the thing with rhubarb, Rooko it just gets better with age - unlike us humans!

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.