Sunday, October 14

Living Lid




Back in January 2011 I posted about our garden plans for the year ahead which included sorting out how our pond filter discharged the filtered water back into the pond. At that stage it looked like this. Not a pretty sight.

Plans changed and we decided to erect a summerhouse which meant moving the filter so this plan was put on hold.

We needed to sort out the area for the summerhouse first so that we could decide where the filter would it into the scheme of things.






We had a sort of brick 'trough' to one end of the pond that had housed a pond filter when we originally built the pond. Pond filters grew in size and so we had to rehouse the filter and over the years the 'trough' has gone through several incarnations, one being as a container for a very large gunnera (it would have been larger had it not had its roots contained). The photo on the left was taken back in 2005!

As is the cyclical nature of things, pond filters have now shrunk again so we decided that we would reuse the 'trough' and relocate a new filter in the original position. 

Although the area of the trough was large enough to house the filter and the necessary electrics, it needed digging deeper and the sides needed building up so over the course of  'summer' this:
Became this:
So now the problem was how to hide the filter whilst still being able to gain access to clean it. A light bulb moment - if you can have a living roof on a shed why not a living lid on a pond filter? One large lid would have been too heavy to lift on and off. Also it will mainly be the front part of the 'box' (notice it's now a 'box' and not a 'trough') that needs to be accessed for cleaning. The rear part houses the electrics. In the greenhouse we had some plastic trays which gave rise to light bulb moment time 2, Martyn created a frame into which three sturdy plastic trays could be slotted.

Some holes were drilled in the trays which have now been planted up with sempervivums and sedum. Space has been left for the plants to spread but if they seem reluctant to do this then I'll plant more.
These have been dressed with the same gravel as we have used on the pebble garden.
The wooden frame still needs staining - I'm planning on using the same colour as the summerhouse. 

Believe it after all this we still haven't solved the issue of how the water feeds back into the pond but we're working on it! 




20 comments:

  1. What a good idea! It certainly looks a lot nicer now.

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    1. And hopefully when finished will look even better, Mark

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  2. You are slick. I love how you hid that! I will remember such ideas if I ever need to cleverly disguise something! Great work.

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    1. It took a fair bit of thinking about though BBB&B still also needs more thinking about the front bit.

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  3. That's a great idea. It'll look even better once the plants fill out.

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    1. It should Jo, if not I'll have to plant more. Guess where I bought my sempervivums from

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    2. I'd guess at somewhere where you won't be able to buy any more, mores the pity.

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  4. Now that's a brilliant solution!

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  5. Wow it looks great...and that was an awful lot of work you managed to keep quiet about Sue. I wonder how you manage to fit all this in along with daily life and the allotment which always looks so tidy...do you have fairies helping you?? If so can you send some my way!!

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    1. Well have to admit Martyn did most of the work - I help with ideas, plant buying and planting. Not sure he'd take too kindly to being referred to a the gardening fairy though.

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  6. Love it - great idea and I do like your pebbles - I need more stones in my garden.

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    1. The pebbles look especially good when wet, Liz which at the moment is most of the time!

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  7. That's brilliant idea!
    Love the pebbles!

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    1. Thanks Malar, just hope it doesn't break when it is moved!

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  8. Wow, it looks great already. I still need to find a way to hide mine so I may "steal" the green roof idea and add it to my Japanese style garden.

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    1. I'll take that as a compliment Liz. If you do post a photo!

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  9. That was a good idea and looks well.

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    1. Thanks Kelli - now I hope the plants thrive. Sempervivum and sedum don't need much depth of soil so hopefully will survive.

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